No Omicron, New Variant of SARS-Cov-2, Has Been Seen in TRNC

No Omicron, New Variant of SARS-Cov-2, Has Been Seen in TRNC
No Omicron, New Variant of SARS-Cov-2, Has Been Seen in TRNC
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The mutation determination analysis carried out by the Near East University on cases with a positive diagnosis in November revealed that the new variant of SARS-CoV-2, Omikron, has not yet reached the TRNC. Near East University researchers are ready to detect the possible entry of Omikron into the country!

Omikron, the new mutation of SARS-CoV-2, which emerged in South Africa and neighboring countries, continues to be followed with concern all over the world. The spread of the Omicron variant to European countries in a short time, which the World Health Organization has pointed out to the risk of causing an increase in cases that may cause serious consequences on a global scale, increases the severity of the World Health Organization's warning.

The possible changes in the rate of spread and the severity of symptoms, as well as the resistance it can show against current vaccines, will be the main parameters that determine the risk posed by the Omikron variant. At this point, the rapid detection of the Omikron variant when it starts to appear in the country is of great importance for the management of the pandemic process.

In this respect, it is of great importance that the SARS-CoV-2 PCR Variant Detection Kit, developed by Near East University researchers to monitor SARS-CoV-2 viral strains, can also detect mutations specific to the Omicron variant. Near East University researchers, who regularly examine positive cases in the country, are planning to detect the variant as soon as it arrives in the country, thanks to the SARS-CoV-2 PCR Variant Detection Kit. The first analyzes performed show that the Omikron variant has not yet reached the TRNC.

Delta variant is still dominant in TRNC with 95 percent!

The research carried out by scientists from the Near East University on cases with a positive diagnosis in November revealed that the Omicron variant has not yet been seen in the TRNC. No Omicron variant was found as a result of the mutation determination analysis performed on 19 people who were diagnosed with COVID-19 positive at the Near East University COVID-50 PCR Diagnostic Laboratory. The study showed that the Delta variant maintains its dominance with 95 percent in local contamination in Northern Cyprus.

prof. Dr. Tamer Şanlıdağ: “With our competent team, PCR Variant Detection Kit and the equipment we have, we continue to work to determine the possible entry of the Omikron variant into our country.”

Stating that they have a strong scientific infrastructure to detect Omikron, the new variant of SARS-CoV-2 that emerged in South Africa and alarmed the whole world, Near East University Deputy Rector Prof. Dr. Tamer Şanlıdağ emphasized that the SARS-CoV-2 PCR Variant Detection Kit, developed by Turkish scientists at the Near East University, is capable of rapidly detecting Omikron like other variants. prof. Dr. Şanlıdağ said, “The mutation determination analyzes performed by our researchers at the Near East University COVID-19 PCR Diagnostic Laboratory revealed that people who were diagnosed positive in November were infected with the Delta variant, as in the previous months. Omicron variant was not found. With our competent team, PCR Variant Detection Kit and the hardware we have, we continue to work to detect the possible entry of the Omikron variant into our country.”

Assoc. Dr. Mahmut Çerkez Ergören: “Delta variant maintains its dominance with 95 percent in local contamination in Northern Cyprus.”

Associate Professor of Near East University COVID-19 PCR Diagnosis and Kit Production Laboratories. Dr. Mahmut Çerkez Ergören, on the other hand, said that in the research they carried out on the cases diagnosed positively in November, they determined that the Omicron variant of SARS-CoV-2 has not yet been seen in the TRNC. Assoc. Dr. Ergören said, "Delta variant maintains its dominance with 95 percent in local contamination in Northern Cyprus."

On November 26, 2021, the World Health Organization issued a global alert, naming the B.1.1.529 variant that originated in southern Africa as Omicron. Researchers in South Africa and around the world continue to work to better understand many aspects of Omikron. A little more time is needed for the effects of the new variant to be revealed more clearly.

The number of people who test positive has increased in areas of South Africa affected by this variant, but epidemiological studies are ongoing to determine whether this is due to Omicron or other factors. It is also unclear how infection with Omicron affects the severity of the disease compared to other variants. Because the first reported Omicron infections were detected in young people who tend to have the disease with milder symptoms. Time is still needed to see how the severity of symptoms will change as the age range increases.

Preliminary evidence suggests an increased risk of re-infection with Omicron compared to other variants of concern. However, this information is also limited. The World Health Organization continues to work to understand the potential impact of this variant on existing countermeasures, including vaccines. At this point, vaccines remain critical in reducing disease severity and mortality, including against the dominant circulating variant Delta.

Widely used PCR tests, on the other hand, continue to detect the Omikron variant, as with other variants. Studies are ongoing to determine if the new variant has any effect on other types of tests, including rapid antigen detection tests.

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