Wearing Narrow-Heeled Shoes Damages Nerves

Wearing Narrow-Heeled Shoes Damages Nerves
Wearing Narrow-Heeled Shoes Damages Nerves
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Morton's neuroma is more common in middle-aged women. Swelling, enlargement and burning pain occur in the nerves between the 3rd and 4th metacarpal bones of people who use narrow-toe and high-heeled shoes.

Stating that the definitive diagnosis of Morton's neuroma is made by physical examination and MR imaging, experts state that the success rate in surgeries is around 90 percent. Experts recommend the use of non-heel and hard-soled shoes, which are not narrow at the ends, and pads that support the comb bones, against the disorder, which is more common in middle-aged women. Üsküdar University NPİSTANBUL Brain Hospital Orthopedic Specialist Assist. Assoc. Dr. Numan Duman made evaluations about Morton's neuroma, which is caused by the use of narrow and high-heeled shoes, and shared his recommendations.

Swelling and enlargement of the nerves

Stating that Morton neuroma causes pain in the forefoot and fingers, Orthopedic Specialist Assist. Assoc. Dr. Numan Duman said, “Swelling and enlargement occur in the nerves between the toes. The most common location is between the 3rd and 4th metatarsal bones of the foot. The main complaint is the burning and throbbing pain felt in the fingers after wearing narrow-toed and high-heeled shoes. When the shoes are removed, the pain may decrease and sometimes numbness may occur in the fingers. said.

Common in middle-aged women

Stating that it is more common in middle-aged women, Duman said, “After the compression of the 4th and 5th comb bones in the feet of people who use narrow-toe and high-heeled shoes, compression, microtrauma and degeneration occur in the nerves going to the finger. After repetitive microtraumas, aggregation in the nerve, that is, a neuroma, occurs. The use of high-heeled and narrow-toed shoes causes microtrauma and compression of the comb bones, thus paving the way for neuroma formation. Shoes with heels, narrow ends and soft soles should not be preferred. A pad that supports the metatarsal bones can be used together with shoes without heels and hard soles that are not narrow at the toe. he said.

First option non-surgical treatment

Orthopedic Specialist Assist. Assoc. Dr. Numan Duman said that a definitive diagnosis of morton's neuroma can be made with physical examination and MRI and concluded his words as follows:

“First, non-surgical treatments are tried. At the beginning of these treatments is the preference of shoes that will reduce the load on the forefoot area and that are not narrow in shape. High-heeled, narrow-toed shoes will bring the scallops closer together and increase the risk of developing a motor neuroma as a result of microtrauma. Pads that support the tip of the comb bones can be placed inside the shoes. Cortisone injection application can reduce pain complaints, but frequent injections should not be made. For patients whose complaints continue despite shoe changes and cortisone injections, the procedure of removing the problematic nerve tissue and loosening the bond between the taut comb bones is performed. We can say that the chance of success in surgeries is 90 percent.”

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