Bird Extinction Report Announced

Birds Extinction Report Announced
Birds Extinction Report Announced
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The World Birds Conservation Organization has announced the European Birds Red List, which it has prepared with thousands of experts and volunteers from 54 countries and regions across Europe. According to this study, one in five birds in Europe is in danger of extinction.

The European Birds Red List has been updated, which determines the danger categories of birds and explains why they are extinct. World Bird Protection Agency has prepared a detailed report with the support of thousands of experts and volunteers from 54 countries and regions across Europe. The red list categories were re-evaluated for 544 bird species living in the region between Greenland, Iceland and Svalbard in the north, the Canary Islands, Malta and Cyprus in the south, the Azores in the west, the Caucasus and the Ural Mountains in the east. Within the scope of this report, the red list category of each species was updated and the risk of extinction was increased. evaluated. The data in the report is important for national and international nature policies and local conservation efforts.

The highlights of the report are as follows:

13% of the birds in Europe, or 71 bird species, are in danger of extinction.

The population of 3 in 1 birds in Europe has drastically disappeared in the last century.

5 in 1 birds in Europe is in danger of extinction.

Ducks and shorebirds (40%), seabirds (30%) and raptors (25%) are among the fastest disappearing groups in Europe.

Common species of open habitats such as larks, shrikes and buntings are also rapidly disappearing; also, duck and shorebird numbers are declining drastically.

Large-scale land use change, intensification of agricultural practices, infrastructure projects, intensive use of marine resources, pollution of inland waters and widespread forestry practices are the main causes of bird population declines observed in European habitats.

The continued population declines and shrinkage of habitats in common species of open habitats such as larks, shrikes and buntings are clearly showing the impact of the overall extinction of all components of nature and increased use of agrochemicals. Some raptor species have recently regained their populations due to legal protection and targeted conservation activities. kazanHowever, many raptor species that depend on open habitats (pasture and scrubland) for food are still declining.

Making a statement about the Red List update, Doğa Derneği Biodiversity Research Coordinator Şafak Arslan said, “On the one hand, the life cycle of birds is rapidly being destroyed, on the other hand, endangered species such as apple-heads, thrushes and turtledoves are hunting. Existing policies and actions are not enough to reverse this situation. In order for the life cycle of birds to continue, there must be a law of nature and new regulations within the framework of this law.” said.

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