History of Virgin Mary House, Where is the Virgin Mary Tomb?

Where is the Virgin Mary House?
Photo: wikipedia

The House of Virgin Mary is a Catholic and Muslim sanctuary located in Bülbüldağı around Ephesus. It is 7 km from Selcuk. The house was discovered following the reported dreams of Anne Catherine Emmerich (19-1774), a Catholic nun in the 1824th century. His views were collected in his book by Clemens Brentano after his death. The Catholic Church has not commented on whether the house really is the Virgin Mary, but since the house was discovered, it regularly receives pilgrimage visits to this day. Anne Catherine Emmerich was born on October 3, 2004, Pope II. I was blessed by Ioannes Paulus.


Catholic pilgrims visit believing that Mary, the mother of Jesus, lived in this house until the Apostle John was brought to this stone house and taken to heaven (Assumption according to the Catholic doctrine, Dormition according to the Orthodox doctrine).

This sacred place was awarded to the visit of various popes and the Patriarchate Blessing. The first pilgrimage visit to Pope XIII in 1896. It was made by Leo, and most recently Pope XVI in 2006. It was visited by Benedict.

It is believed that the tomb of Meryem is also in Bülbüldağı.

There is a small Byzantine church in the ruins of Virgin Mary, which passes by the upper gate of the ancient city of Ephesus. It is believed that Mary's mother Mary lived and died here. Besides Christians, it is considered sacred and visited by Muslims, healing is sought for patients, and votives are devoted.

Place

The temple can be defined as a modest place of worship rather than large. Its construction and preserved stones date back to the Age of Apostles, consistent with other buildings that have been preserved since then. Only small garden arrangements and add-ons for worship outside the building have been made. At the entrance to the temple, visitors encounter a large room with a statue of the Blessed Virgin Mary in the center, and an altar across the street.

There is a smaller room on the right. (It is traditionally believed to be the main room where the Virgin Mary slept.) In the tradition, it is believed that the room where the Virgin Mary slept and rested was a kind of canal with a flowing water coming out of the fountain outside the building.

Wish Wall

Outside the temple, there is a kind of wish wall, where incoming visitors tie their personal intentions with paper or fabric. There are various fruit trees, flowers and additional lighting outside the temple for better observation of the house. There is also a kind of fountain or well, which some visitors believe in the groove of extraordinary fertility and healing power.

The temple can be defined as a modest place of worship rather than large. Its construction and preserved stones date back to the Age of Apostles, consistent with other buildings that have been preserved since then. Only small garden arrangements and add-ons for worship outside the building have been made. At the entrance to the temple, visitors encounter a large room with a statue of the Blessed Virgin Mary in the center, and an altar across the street.

There is a smaller room on the right. (It is traditionally believed to be the main room where the Virgin Mary slept.) In the tradition, it is believed that the room where the Virgin Mary slept and rested was a kind of canal with a flowing water coming out of the fountain outside the building.

Wish Wall

Outside the temple, there is a kind of wish wall, where incoming visitors tie their personal intentions with paper or fabric. There are various fruit trees, flowers and additional lighting outside the temple for better observation of the house. There is also a kind of fountain or well, which some visitors believe in the groove of extraordinary fertility and healing power.

Disclosure in Germany

At the beginning of the 19th century, Mother Catherine Emmerich, a bedridden Agustunyan nun in Germany, reports a series of views, stating that Jesus saw the last days of her life and the details of her mother Mary's life. Emmerich, who is in Dülmen's agricultural community, has been sick for a long time but is known in Germany for his mystical powers and is visited by important people.

One of Emmerich's visitors is the writer Clemens Brentano. After his first visit, he visits Emmerich every day for five years in Dülmen and writes what he saw. After Emmerich's death, Brentano prints a book based on his collected views, and the second book is published after his own death.

One of Emmerich's views was the depiction of the house in which Ephesus made John in Ephesus for the mother of Jesus, where Mary lived until the end of her life. Emmerich gave a number of details about the location of the house and the topography of its surroundings.

“Mary lived not exactly in Ephesus but somewhere nearby. Mary's house was three and a half hours from Ephesus on a hill on the left on the road from Jerusalem. This hill was steeply uphill from Ephesus, the city was on a rising ground according to someone approaching from the southeast. The narrow road extends to a hill to the south, at the top of this hill there was a trapezoidal plateau that can be reached with a half-hour journey. "

Emmerich also described the details of the house: he stated that it was made of rectangular stones, the windows were placed high, close to the flat roof, consisted of two parts and a fireplace in the center. He also depicted details such as the location of the doors and the shape of the chimney. The book containing these details was published in Munich, Germany in 1852.

Exploration in Turkey

Based on his speech with Emmerich on October 18, 1881, based on the book written by Brentano, a French priest named Abbé Julien Gouyet discovered a small stone building and the ruins of ancient Ephesus on a mountain overlooking the Aegean Sea. He believed that this was the house where the Virgin Mary, who Emmerich described, spent the last years.

The discovery of Abbé Gouyet was not taken seriously by most people, but ten years later, Sister Marie de Mandat-Grancey, at the insistence of DC, the two Lazarist missionaries Father Poulin and Father Jung rediscovered the building in Izmir on July 29, 1891. . They learned that this four-walled roofless ruin was long respected by the locals of Sirince, 17 km away, the descendants of the first Christians of Ephesus. They called the house Panaya Kapulu ("The door to the Virgin"). A pilgrimage visit is held here on August 15, where most Christians celebrate the Ascension (Dormition) of each year.

Sister Marie de Mandat-Grancey was chosen by the Catholic Church as the founder of the House of Mary, and was responsible for the restoration of the house and the protection of the area around the mountain and the house of Mary until 1915, when she died. [13] The discovery enlivened and strengthened the "Ephesus tradition", a tradition dating back to the 12th century. This tradition was in competition with the older “Jerusalem tradition” and the place where the Holy Virgin was taken to heaven. Pope XIII. Leo's in 1896 and Pope XXIII. Due to Ioannes' actions in 1961, the Catholic Church removed the main amnesty from the Dormition Church in Jerusalem and then donated it to pilgrims at the house of Mary in Ephesus.

archaeology

The restored part of the building is distinguished from the original remains of the building by a red painted line. Some expressed their doubts about the field, as Mary's relationship with Ephesus occurred only in the 12th century, and it was said that Mary lived in Jerusalem in the universal tradition of the church fathers, and therefore was taken to heaven. Their supporters based their beliefs on the fact that the Virgin Mary Church, the first church dedicated to the Virgin Mary, was located in Ephesus in the 5th century.

Attitude of the Roman Catholic Church

The Roman Catholic Church never pronounced the originality of the house, as there was not enough scientific evidence. However, in 1896 Pope XIII. It is understood from Leo's blessing during his first pilgrimage that they viewed the region positively. Pope XII. Pius upgraded the house to the status of Holy Place upon the definition of the rise of Mary in 1951, then Pope XXIII. This status will be made permanent by Ioannes. The region is respected and visited by Muslims as well as Christians. Pilgrims drink from boiling water, which is believed to have healing properties under the house.

A religious ritual is held here every year on August 15 to commemorate the reception of Mary into heaven.

Pope's visits

Pope VI. Paulus on July 26, 1967, Pope II. Ioannes Paulus on November 30, 1979 and Pope XVI. Pope Benedict visited holy house they had done during the four-day visit to Turkey on November 29, 2006.


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